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Summertime is Moving Time: Moving Tips for Kids

Many families with school-age children move to a new home during the summer. In fact, more than 10 million kids in the United States relocate each year. Moving can be exciting, but also a bit scary - especially for children. With that in mind, Allied Van Lines worked with a child psychologist to develop tips for a smooth move:

Communication is key. Mr. Olkowski advises parents to tell children about a move as soon as possible. Present the move in a positive manner, even if parents don't always see it that way.

Give children a chance to say goodbye. Consider hosting a moving party. You can give your children address books and scrapbooking material so they can keep connected with their old home, friends and community.

Move in together. Parents should take time to explore the new neighborhood with their children. Also, check with schools about testing, attendance and extracurricular activities.

Encourage children to be part of the moving process. That means packing, unpacking and even decorating. Something for kids to consider would be if they want to develop a broad concept for their bedroom - perhaps a jungle safari or underwater adventure.

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